Tag Archives: Gifted

Resources

Javits Program Project Director’s Meeting Webinars on December 6, 12, and 13, 2022:

Performance

No performance data currently available.

 

Legislation, Regulations and Guidance

Legislation

Program Authority: Section 4644 of the ESEA, as amended by the ESSA (20 U.S.C. 7294).

The authorizing legislation can be found at https://www2.ed.gov/documents/essa-act-of-1965.pdf
(see pages 295 through 297 of the legislation).

Regulations

EDGAR

Funding Status

2022

Appropriation: $14,500,000
$6,708,471 for 13 New Awards
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$5,761,530 for Continuation Awards
$903,309 for Frontloaded Awards to 4 Existing Grantees

2021

Appropriation: $13,500,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$11,514,814 for Continuation Awards
$984,186 for Frontloaded Awards

2020

Appropriation: $13,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$9,965,927 for Continuation Awards
$1,419,368 for Funding Down the 2019 Slate (3 new awards)
$614,705 for supplement and frontload awards

2019

Appropriation: $12,000,000
$4,047,789 for new awards
$7,238,635 for continuation awards
$642,962 for frontloaded awards

2018

Appropriation: $12,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$10,506,537 for continuation awards
$439,918 for 1 new award
$53,545 for supplemental and frontloaded awards

2017

Appropriation: $12,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$5,237,014 for new awards
$5,667,099 for continuation awards

2016

Appropriation: $12,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$11,000,000 for continuation awards

2015

Appropriation: $10,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES)
$4,000,000 for new awards
$5,000,000 for continuation awards

2014

Appropriation: $5,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES).
$4,000,000 for Discretionary Grants.

2013

No funding available

2012

No New Awards

2011

No New Awards

2010

Appropriation: $7,463,000
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 0
Average New Awards $0
Number of Continuation Awards: 15
Average Continuation Award: $386,801
Range of Continuation Awards: $83,072-$450,001

2014

Appropriation: $5,000,000
$1,000,000 for Research (IES).
$4,000,000 for Discretionary Grants.

2013

No funding available

2012

No New Awards

2011

No New Awards

2010

Appropriation: $7,463,000
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 0
Average New Awards $0
Number of Continuation Awards: 15
Average Continuation Award: $386,801
Range of Continuation Awards: $83,072-$450,001

2009

Appropriation: $7,463,000
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 8
Average New Awards $350,331
Number of Continuation Awards: 7
Average Continuation Award: $386,801
Range of Continuation Awards: $83,072-$450,001

2008

Appropriation: $7,463,000
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 6
Average New Awards $441,000
Range of Continuation Awards: $200,000-$400,000

2006

Appropriation: $9,596,000
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 1 – NRC
Number of Continuation Awards Anticipated: 25
Average Continuation Award: $300,000
Range of Continuation Awards: $200,000-$400,000

2005

Appropriation: $11,022,112
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 13
Average Award: $300,000
Range of Awards: $200,000 – $400,000

2004

Appropriation: $11,111,056

2003

Appropriation: $11,176,875
Number of New Awards Anticipated: 17
Average Award: $360,000
Range of Awards: $200,000 – $500,000

2002

Appropriation: $11,250,000

2001

Appropriation: $7,500,000

2000

Appropriation: $6,500,000

Frequently Asked Questions

Archive Information – For Historic Purposes Only

1. Introduction of FAQs

These Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are comprised of questions and answers generated by U.S. Department of Education (Department) staff based primarily on questions submitted to the Department by prospective applicants for funds (and other interested parties) under the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education (Javits) program (CFDA Number 84.206A).  The Department will update these FAQs with questions and answers from the applicants’ teleconference scheduled for Monday, June 9, 2014, at 2:00 p.m. (Eastern Standard Time), and periodically through June 24, 2014, the deadline date for the transmittal of applications under the FY 2014 Javits grant competition.  The Javits program is authorized under Title V, Part D, Subpart 6 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA) (20 U.S.C. 7253-7253e).

2. How does an eligible entity apply for a Javits grant? Are we required to apply electronically?

As a general matter, applications for grants under the Javits program must be submitted electronically using the Government wide Grants.gov Apply site at www.Grants.gov.  Through this site, an eligible entity can download a copy of the application package, complete the application offline, and then upload and submit the completed application.  You must search for the downloadable application package for this program by the CFDA number.  Do not include the CFDA number’s alpha suffix in your search (e.g., search for 84.206, not 84.206A).  Please note that you must have a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number as well as a Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) in order to submit an application through the Grants.gov website.  For information about how to obtain a DUNS number and TIN, as well as additional information about the FY 2014 Javits competition, including exceptions to the electronic filing requirement, please refer to Applications for New Awards; Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program ( 79 Fed. Reg. 24695), published in the Federal Register on May 1, 2014 (<!–>

a>–>>https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/05/01/2014-10004/applications-for-new-awards-jacob-k-javits-gifted-and-talented-students-education-program).

3. Is an eligible entity that does not submit a “notice of intent to apply” for an FY 2014 Javits grant still eligible to apply?

Yes, an eligible entity that does not submit a “notice of intent to apply” for an FY 2014 Javits grant by the deadline date is still eligible to apply.  Submitting a notice of intent to apply is not mandatory, but it helps the Department for planning purposes to have an idea of how many applicants plan to apply.

4. Does the estimated range of awards refer to the amount of grant funds per year or the total amount of grant funds for all years of the project (up to five years)?

The estimated range of awards refers to the approximate amount of funds we expect to award each grantee on an annual basis.  Grants may be awarded for a period of up to five years, or 60 months.

5. Are charter schools eligible to apply for Javits grants?

As a general matter, charter schools are public schools and, therefore, are eligible to apply for Javits grants as public entities.  Some charter schools are also considered to be LEAs under their States’ charter school laws – these charter schools are eligible to apply for Javits grants as public entities or as LEAs.

6. Are individuals eligible to apply for Javits grants?

No, individuals are not eligible to apply for Javits grants.

7. Are private schools, including Catholic and other religious schools, eligible to apply directly to the Department for these grants?

Yes, private schools are eligible to apply directly to the Department for Javits grants as private agencies or organizations to the extent they meet the eligibility and all other applicable requirements.  If a private school is awarded a Javits grant, it then becomes a recipient of Federal financial assistance and is subject to the laws and regulations that apply to recipients of Federal funds as well as the specific requirements of the Javits program. This is a factor for all prospective applicants, particularlyprivate and religious entities, to consider prior to applying for a grant.

8. Are grant recipients required to provide for the equitable participation of private school students and teachers?

Yes, under section 5466(a) of the ESEA, Javits grantees must provide for the “equitable participation of students and teachers in private nonprofit elementary and secondary schools, including the participation of teachers and other personnel in professional development programs serving such students.”

To meet this requirement, each eligible entity applying for a grant under the Javits program must reach out to private school officials in the geographic area to be served by the grant program and inquire as to their interest in having their students and teachers participate in the proposed project. If private school officials express an interest in having their students and teachers participate in the proposed Javits project, the applicant should begin consultation with those private school officials regarding how to provide for the equitable participation of those private school students and teachers in the proposed project.

The eligible entity should engage in consultation with private school officials and provide them with information related to the program, including the allowable activities available to private school students and teachers, the roles of public and private school officials, and how the specific needs of private school students and teachers would be addressed within the parameters of the program. The eligible entity also should provide opportunities for the private school officials to ask questions and offer suggestions about the proposed project. Then, in developing the grant proposal, the eligible entity takes the information provided by the private school officials into consideration in order to provide for the equitable participation of those private school students and teachers.

The consultation between the applicant and private school officials should occur before the applicant makes any decision that affects the opportunities of private school children and teachers to participate in the project and should be ongoing throughout the design and development of the program. If prior to, or following consultation, the private school officials express that they are not interested in having their students and teachers participate in the program, the eligible entity has no further obligation to those private schools, assuming that the eligible entity has provided clear and sufficient notice of the deadline for responding and given adequate time for private school officials to respond.

For a list of private schools in your geographic area, non-LEA applicants may want to contact the LEA in which the Javits program will be implemented to inquire about private schools (located within the geographic area of the LEA) that have previously expressed to the LEA an interest in participating in Federal education programs, or use the Department’s private school locator at <!–>–>>http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pss/privateschoolsearch/.

9. May a university partner with another eligible entity, such as a local educational agency (LEA) or State educational agency (SEA), to submit an application under the FY 2014 Javits grant competition?

Universities generally qualify as institutions of higher education and, therefore, are eligible to apply for Javits grants on their own.  An eligible entity, such as an institution of higher education, also may partner with one or more other eligible entities (i.e., LEAs, SEAs, other public agencies, or other private agencies or organizations) to apply for a grant as a group, or partnership.  Partnerships are not required but, if a partnership application is submitted, it must meet the requirements for group applications in sections 75.127-75.129 of the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) (34 C.F.R. 75.127-75.129).  Group applicants must, among other things, designate one entity to serve as lead applicant and submit with the application an agreement that details the activities that each member of the group plans to perform and binds each member of the group to every statement and assurance made in the application.

10. What is the ESEA definition of LEA?

Section 9101(26) of the ESEA defines a local educational agency, or LEA, in pertinent part, as a public board of education or other public authority legally constituted within a state for either administrative control or direction of, or to perform a service function for, public elementary schools or secondary schools in a city, county, township, school district, or other political subdivision of a State, or of or for a combination of school districts or counties that is recognized in a State as an administrative agency for its public elementary schools or secondary schools.  For the full definition of LEA, please refer to section 9101(26) of the ESEA (20 U.S.C. 7801(26)).

11. What does the term “absolute priority” mean with respect to applications for new awards under the Javits program?

For FY 2014 (and any year in which the Department makes awards from the list of unfunded applicants from this competition), the Secretary has established an absolute priority under the Javits program for “Javits demonstration programs.”  This means that we will consider for funding only applications that meet the absolute priority (see 34 C.F.R. 75.105(c)(3)).  In order to meet the absolute priority, grantees must “scale up” and evaluate models designed to increase the number of gifted and talented students from underrepresented groups who, through gifted and talented education programs, perform at high levels of academic achievement.  For this priority, “scaling up” means selecting a model designed to increase the number of gifted and talented students from underrepresented groups who, through gifted and talented education programs, perform at high levels of academic achievement that has demonstrated effectiveness on a small scale and expanding the model for use with gifted and talented students in broader settings (such as in multiple schools, grade levels, or districts, or in other educational settings) or with different populations of gifted and talented students (i.e., different populations of these students based on differences such as the socioeconomic, racial, ethnic, geographic, and linguistic backgrounds of the students and their families).  With regard to this priority, the term “underrepresented groups” includes economically disadvantaged individuals, individuals with limited English proficiency, and individuals with disabilities.  For a description of the specific information applications must include in order to meet the absolute priority, prospective applicants should refer to the notice inviting applications for new awards under the Javits program, published in the Federal Register on May 1, 2014 (79 Fed. Reg. 24695) (<!–>

a>–>>https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/05/01/2014-10004/applications-for-new-awards-jacob-k-javits-gifted-and-talented-students-education-program).

12. Within the context of formatting the application, should charts be single- or double-spaced?

Charts should be single-spaced.

13. Who should prospective applicants contact for questions regarding the Grants.gov system if we have problems when trying to submit applications electronically?

Prospective applicants who are having problems submitting their applications electronically should call the Grants.gov Help Desk at 1-800-518-4726.  The technician should provide you with a Grants.gov Support Desk Case Number.  Please keep a record of your case number, since you will need it in the event that you are unable to submit your application due to technical issues with the Grants.gov website.  Please follow the instructions in the notice inviting applications for new awards, published in the Federal Register on May 1, 2014(79 Fed. Reg. 24695, 24698), for submitting a paper application if you are prevented from submitting your application electronically on the application deadline date because of technical problems with the Grants.gov system. The May 1, 2014 Federal Register notice is also available online at <!–>–>>https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/05/01/2014-10004/applications-for-new-awards-jacob-k-javits-gifted-and-talented-students-education-program.

14. Is there a minimum number of students who must participate in a Javits project in order for the project to be funded?

No, there is no minimum number of students who must participate in a Javits project in order for the project to be funded.

15. What if a grantee, such as an LEA, does not have a set indirect cost rate (established by its SEA or other cognizant agency) or doesn’t know what it is?

A grantee must have obtained a current indirect cost rate agreement from its cognizant agency in order to charge indirect costs to a grant.  Therefore, the grantee should contact its cognizant agency (or, in the case of an LEA, its SEA) to find out what its indirect cost rate is, or  to have an indirect cost rate calculated and approved.  For more information regarding indirect cost rates, please see 34 C.F.R. 75.560-75.580 (indirect cost rates) or visit the Department’s website at http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocfo/intro.html.

16. Can an LEA use its SEA’s indirect cost rate?

No, an LEA must use its own indirect cost rate.

17. Where can we access more information regarding the FY 2014 Javits grant competition?

For additional information regarding the FY 2014 Javits grant competition, please refer to the Javits Web site at www.ed.gov/programs/javits.

Eligibility

Who May Apply: (by category) State educational agencies, local educational agencies, the Bureau of Indian Education, institutions of higher education, other public agencies, and other private agencies and organizations.

 

 

Awards

Javits Program Grantees and Funded Applications

The following chart provides the names of the new award grantees by respective fiscal year, the award numbers associated with each grant, the total amount awarded to each grantee for Year 1 of a five-year funding cycle and a redacted copy of the grantee’s funded application.  Copies of the redacted applications are available by clicking the link to each award number.

FY 2022

2022 Grantee by PR Award Number and Application Year 1 Award Amount
S206A220049 – University of Hawaii $680,854
S206A220026 – The School District of Osceola County, Florida $503,339
S206A220040 – University of Connecticut $463,436
S206A220009 – Florida Atlantic University $484,293
S206A220019 – St. John’s University, New York $523,250
S206A220037 – Educational Service Unit 2 $730,000
S206A220015 – Purdue University $714,640
S206A220048 – Independent School District 271 $403,753
S206A220047 – Austin Independent School District $597,260
S206A220014 – Ball State University $388,335
S206A220038 – Purdue University $554,022
S206A220010 – Milwaukee Board of School Directors $136,927
S206A220031 – Eastern Michigan University $528,362

FY 2020

2020 PR Award Number and Application Year 1 Award Amount
S206A200038 – Johns Hopkins University $667,261
S206A200029 – Colorado Seminary dba University of Denver $524,660
S206A200037 – Sports and Arts in Schools Foundation $398,934
S206A200007 – East Tennessee State University $495,774

FY 2019

2019 PR Award Number and Application Year 1 Award Amount
S206A190008 – University of Arkansas at Little Rock $494,260
S206A190009 – Milwaukee Board of School Directors $563,652
S206A190014 – West Virginia University $94,331
S206A190020 – Purdue University $334,186
S206A190022 – Minnesota Department of Education $401,425
S206A190023 – University of Connecticut $434,119
S206A190025 – George Mason University $594,527
S206A190028 – University of Connecticut $470,551
S206A190030 – School Board of Pinellas County, Florida $342,501

2018

MS Word (23 KB)

2017

MS Word (44 KB)

2015

MS Word (54 KB)

2014

MS Word (316 KB)

2012

No New Awards

2011

No New Awards

2010

No New Awards

The 2009 grantees are being funded down the slate.
MS WORD (53kB)

In 2008, the Department received 65 applications for the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program. Of the 57 applications deemed eligible for review, the Department funded 7 grants totaling $2,639,726. Future funding for these grants will be contingent on the availability of funds and each grantee’s substantial progress toward accomplishing the goals and objectives of the project as described in its approved application. (The attached MS Word document includes project abstracts, contact, and funding information).
MS WORD (53kB)

In 2007, the Javits appropriation was cut substantially. As a result, a new competition for 2007 will not be held. Future competitions are contingent upon future appropriations.

In 2006, the Javits appropriation was cut substantially. As a result, a new grant competition was not held.

In 2005, the Department received 140 applications for the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program. Of the 140 applications received, the Department funded 14 Priority Two grants totaling approximately $3.5 million. Future funding is pending the availability of any new funds in FY 2006. (The attached MS Word document includes project abstracts, contact, and funding information).
MS WORD (41K)

Applicant Information

FY 2022 Javits Notice Inviting Applications (NIA)

  • The NIA was posted in the Federal Register on February 16, 2022. A notice extending the deadline for receiving FY 2022 applications was posted in the Federal Register on March 16, 2022.

FY 2022 Javits Competition Timeline

  • NIA Available: February 16, 2022
  • The full NIA can be found in the Federal Register.
  • The Extension of the Application Deadline Date of April 11, 2022 can be found here in the Federal Register.

FY 2022 Javits Competition Application Instructions

The Javits Application Package is available for applicants to download and use as a guide only. This document can also be found on Grants.gov.  Unless the applicant qualifies for an exception to the electronic submission requirement, all Javits grant applications must be submitted electronically via Grants.gov.

FY 2022 Javits Application Instructions:  PDF

Technical Assistance (TA) Pre-Application Meeting for Prospective Applicants

FY 2022 Javits Grant Competition – Technical Assistance (TA) Pre-Application Meeting for Prospective Applicants Presentation

To assist applicants in preparing applications, the Department is hosting a FY 2022 Pre-Application Meeting on:

Thursday, February 24, 2022 (1:00 pm – 4:00 pm) Eastern Time

Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program

What’s New

The Javits Program Project Director’s Meeting webinars were held on December
6, 12, and 13, 2022. To view presentations from the webinars, please go to the
Resources tab.

The FY 2022 Javits Program Grantees were announced in September 2022. For
more information about these grantees and to view their funded applications,
please go to the Awards tab.

Program Description

The purpose of this program is to carry out a coordinated program of evidence-based research, demonstration projects, innovative strategies, and similar activities designed to build and enhance the ability of elementary schools and secondary schools nationwide to identify gifted and talented students and meet their special educational needs. The major emphasis of the program is on serving students traditionally underrepresented in gifted and talented programs (particularly economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient (LEP), and disabled students) to help reduce the serious gap in achievement among certain groups of students at the highest levels of achievement.

Grants are awarded under two priorities. Priority One supports initiatives to develop and scale up models serving students who are underrepresented in gifted and talented programs. Priority Two supports state and local efforts to improve services for gifted and talented students.

Types of Projects

Programs and projects assisted under this program may include any of the following:

  • Conducting evidence-based research on methods and techniques for identifying and teaching gifted and talented students and for using gifted and talented programs and methods to identify and provide the opportunity for all students to be served, particularly low-income and at-risk students.
  • Establishing and operating programs and projects for identifying and serving gifted and talented students, including innovative methods and strategies (such as summer programs, mentoring programs, peer tutoring programs, service learning programs, and cooperative learning programs involving business, industry and education) for identifying and educating students who may not be served by traditional gifted and talented programs.
  • Providing technical assistance and disseminating information, which may include how gifted and talented programs and methods may be adapted for use by all students, particularly low-income and at-risk students.

In addition, the program supports the National Center for Research on Gifted Education for the purpose of carrying out the allowable activities described above.